A Fusion of Urban and Rural

24 September 2020

Natural Habitats' Supreme Award-winning landscape at Goodside and B:Hive is part of the Smales Farm business district.

Located on the North Shore in Auckland, the development is Australasia' largest and smartest co-working space, packed with state of the art facilities.

The hospitality precinct, Goodside, houses a brilliant collection of dining options and the 'modern market garden' aims to create a self-sustaining community and dining in a lush, green landscape.

Location: Auckland

Date Completed: 2019

Project Type: Commercial co-working space & green innovation

Awards: For this project, Natural Habitats received the following Landscapes of Distinction Awards:

Supreme Award Winner
Gold - Landscape Design
Gold - Landscape Construction
Gold - Landscape Horticulture
Gold - Garden Management

Adjoining Goodside is the vibrant, next-generation co-working space, B:Hive. Together, Goodside and B:Hive delivers a revolutionary space, reimagining how people can work, live and play.

The landscape was designed with the vision to draw on the history of Smales Farm by playing on the idea of 'agricultural farming'.  Materials were sourced materials for Goodside such as hoggin, timber, basalt and concrete as they were characteristic to the agricultural industry and country lifestyle, representing a fusion of rural and urban environments.  A huge variety of New Zealand native trees and perennial plantings were used to create a biodiverse and sustainable landscape with herb gardens and fruit trees.  The greenhouse is not only a stunning feature, but it is also fully functional, providing an environment where produce can thrive over the colder months.

Podium landscapes always seem to present themselves with challenges. However, being consulted during the early project design phase meant we were able to influence the engineering to enable the client’s landscape vision.

The B:Hive landscape was designed and constructed to create an easy-care, long life garden, creating a soft, green aspect to what would otherwise be concrete, architectural structures.  The mondo planters mimic the contours of the islands in the Hauraki Gulf, while steel plant climbing structures complement the vertical nature of the foyer and central stairwell.

The landscape has succeeded in creating a self-sustaining community, a garden-esk indoor atmosphere and supports the Smales Farm idea to bridge the gap between a workplace and living/dining environment.

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